As co-founder and executive chairman of one of Australia’s largest consumer magazine publishing businesses, David Gardiner has turned unknown brands into household names.

But bowel cancer doesn’t discriminate, and despite his personal success, David was diagnosed with Australia’s second deadliest cancer at age 51.

Inspired by the commitment of patron Richard Penn to improving outcomes for people affected by bowel cancer, Gavin Fox-Smith joined Bowel Cancer Australia’s board in 2004.

“I’ve always believed in the mission,” said Gavin.

Evidence has long suggested an association between mouth bacteria that enters the bloodstream via bleeding gums and serious infections of the brain, liver, and heart, as well as preterm birth in pregnant women.

The presence of the bacterium, known as ‘fusobacterium nucleatum’, has also been shown to be very high in bowel tumours.

Bowel cancer remains Australia’s second deadliest cancer and ranks among the top five killers overall of Australians aged 45-74.i

Yet the latest National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) Report released today by the AIHW reveals participation rates continue to hover at 42.4% and colonoscopy wait times for those who receive a positive screen far exceed the ‘desirable’ 30 days.ii
 

When Director Richard Griffin AM was in preparatory school, he was given some medical advice by the Matron: ‘Listen to your body and act on it.’

“She drilled into us that it was not “sissy” or “weak” to talk about one’s concerns with medical professionals,” says Richard.

That advice probably saved Richard’s life.

 
Bowel Cancer Australia is excited to have been selected as a charity beneficiary for the 2020 Dry July campaign. 
 
2020 has been a challenging year. So this July, the Dry July Foundation has introduced some new options.
 
They're calling it Dry(ish) July.
 
Challenge yourself to 31 days dry, or this year, have a Dry(ish) July and choose 21 or 14 days dry.
 

A new Australian study has found the rates of bowel cancer in people under 50 continue to rise, supporting Bowel Cancer Australia’s Never2Young campaign to lower the screening age from 50 to 45.
 
Published in the ANZ Journal of Surgery (8 June 2020), the Gold Coast study found growing evidence of increasing rates of bowel cancer in people under age 50 after reviewing 557 patients who received a colonoscopy between 2013 and 2017.
 

Visible bowel cancer symptoms are NOT NORMAL. They require prompt investigation to rule out bowel cancer as the underlying cause.
 
With over 325 new cases and 108 deaths estimated weekly (16,938/5,597 annually - AIHW 2019), during Bowel Cancer Awareness Month this June, Australian’s are reminded that despite the NEW NORMAL, some things remain NOT NORMAL, such as - 
 

Did you know, the rates for bowel cancer have been declining among adults over 50, but rising in adults UNDER 50?
 
Unfortunately, young-onset patients are more likely to be diagnosed with bowel cancer in Stage 3 or 4, when the disease is harder to treat. Missed symptoms and misdiagnosis can often delay the correct diagnosis in young-onset cases.