Latest News

16
Apr
2015
 
At 92, Lawrence Penn still loves tearing about on his motorcycle, firing up the chainsaw and having a hearty chuckle with his great grandchildren. But had he not had the good sense to get a check-up 30 years ago when parts of his body weren't working as they should, he would not be around today.
 
A retired Qantas pilot, Mr Penn was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 1985 and spent the following two years fighting to survive it. Bowel cancer has a 90 per cent survival rate if caught early and Mr Penn is living proof of this fact.
16
Apr
2015

New research from the US has found that women, but not men, who were overweight as children or teenagers have an increased risk of bowel cancer regardless of their adult weight.

The findings suggest that childhood obesity can cast a long shadow over the health of a generation and deserves more attention.
 
Using data from two large, well-respected studies - the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study - about 75,000 women and more than 34,000 men were included in the research. More than 2,000 cases of bowel cancers were identified during 22 years of participant follow-up.
15
Apr
2015

Bowel Cancer Australia has welcomed the Federal Government's campaign to boost participation in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). This is urgently needed with just 33 per cent of people completing the test.

The new campaign - A gift for living – includes a website, promotional resources and advertisements in various media including newspapers and radio.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia chief executive Mr Julien Wiggins said a broad-based, sustained awareness and education campaign is an important component of increasing participation in the Government Program.
13
Apr
2015
 
At 28, Robyn Lindley was a newlywed. She had just purchased a new home and had a five-month-old child. The last thing the new mother expected was to be diagnosed with bowel cancer.
 
Mrs Lindley said all she could do was follow the directions of her doctors. Now, 10 years on, she is a healthy and happy mother to three children, and is encouraging patients to be tested for the RAS gene - like she was.
01
Apr
2015
 
Australia enjoys an international reputation for high quality health and medical research leading to world class innovations such as the cochlear implant and a vaccine for cervical cancer. A relatively small market in global terms, Australian research punches above its weight – accounting for around 3 per cent of the world's medical research outputs from just 1.1 per cent of global health research dollars.
 
To maintain and expand this valuable research contribution requires a collective long-term funding commitment from government, industry, charitable and philanthropic organisations, and the community. Every dollar invested in health and medical research returns, on average, more than two dollars in health benefits.
 
The challenge for all funders is to ensure maximum impact for all money invested in cancer research as there is only a finite pool of taxpayer dollars available. 
Page 1 of 126