Latest News

26
Aug
2015
 
A mother-of-three who has advanced bowel cancer is pleading with other young parents to ''trust their instincts'' about their health.
 
'Be aware of your body and if you know something's not right, keep asking questions about it. You're never too young to get cancer, so don't dismiss it as an option,' Kat Lawrenson, of Cromwell, says.
26
Aug
2015
 
If a colonoscopy seems like the type of thing you'd like to get done with quickly, think again.
 
Research by a Veterans Affairs team has confirmed that longer-lasting colonoscopies are associated with lower cancer rates.
 
The findings appeared online July 9, 2015, in Gastroenterology.  They were based on nearly 77,000 screening colonoscopies.
25
Aug
2015
 
Risk from the second most common cancer in Australia could be reduced through the long-term use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows.
 
A team from the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark found that people taking 75-150 mg of aspirin continuously for 5 years or longer saw an associated 27% reduced risk for CRC, increasing to 30-45% for those taking non-aspirin NSAIDs. The largest risk reductions come from NSAIDs that target specific enzymes for inflammation and pain. 
 
The study group was made up of 10,280 adults with first-time CRC and 102,800 control participants. Lifestyle factors such as diet, weight and exercise were not measured.
25
Aug
2015
 
(Reuters Health) - People who have been treated for colon cancer are less likely to get adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery to reduce the risk of future cancer if they have to travel far for the appointments, according to a new study.
 
In some cases in the study, "travel distance to treatment was really a barrier for patients to receive treatment," said lead author Chun Chieh Lin of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, Georgia.
 
"We tried to understand how oncologist availability in the area could be another barrier, and we found that for patients without private insurance, oncologists do make a difference," she told Reuters Health by phone.
 
Her team analyzed data from close to 35,000 patients with stage III colon cancer diagnosed between 2007 and 2010.  Three-quarters of them received adjuvant chemo within 90 days of cancer surgery.
 
As distance to the chemotherapy center increased, the likelihood of getting the chemo decreased.  Patients who had to travel more than 250 miles were about 60% less likely to get it than those who had to travel less than 12.5 miles.
 
 
21
Aug
2015
Bowel Cancer Australia today released a new report, authored by Australian experts, recommending urgent action to reduce the number of Australians projected to die from this common cancer.
 
The release of the 'Lifting the Lid on Advanced Bowel Cancer' report follows a national survey of almost 300 patients, which found Australians with bowel cancer feel like they have the 'wrong cancer' due to lack of public attention, support services and treatments.
 
Julien Wiggins, Chief Executive, Bowel Cancer Australia explains: "Bowel cancer has the second highest disease burden of any cancer in Australia, yet it received 40 per cent less research funding from the NHMRC compared to breast cancer from 2005 to 2014.  Furthermore, bowel cancer received less than a fifth of the grants and funding provided by Cancer Australia for research and support services compared to breast and prostate cancer."
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