Latest News

25
Mar
2015

There is some welcome news for a sub-group of young bowel cancer patients - those with Lynch syndrome - as new research quashes any concerns about infertility in survivors.

An Australian study of more than 1,000 men and women with Lynch syndrome, the most common genetic condition predisposing people to early onset bowel cancer, found fertility rates were typically unaffected by a diagnosis of bowel cancer.

25
Mar
2015
An Australian woman diagnosed with bowel cancer at the age of 28 is the face of an international campaign to improve the current five-year survival rate of just 16 per cent for patients with an advanced form of the disease.
 
Gladstone (Qld) mother of three Robyn Lindley is sharing her story as part of the global Get Tested campaign. It aims to ensure all advanced bowel cancer patients are offered a genetic test, known as a RAS biomarker test, either at diagnosis or before the start of their medical treatment.
24
Mar
2015
If you've been flirting with the idea of embracing a more plant-based diet but just can't seem to get motivated, then this year's Meat Free Week (23-29 March) is for you.
 
For the second year running, Bowel Cancer Australia has teamed up with Meat Free Week to advocate for the artichokes, barrack for the broccoli, support the humble celery, and bring out the 'flexitarian' hiding in every one of us.
 
There's no doubt that most of us can use a little more fruit and veg in our diets. It's good not only for our overall health and wellbeing — but also in helping to reduce the risk of bowel cancer.
23
Mar
2015
'Cut back on red meat and replace it with fish' is the take home message from a recent US study about the influence of various dietary patterns on bowel cancer risk.
 
Findings from the study of more than 77,000 adults show people identifying as some form of vegetarian were less likely to develop bowel cancer than non-vegetarians.
 
Vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, pescovegetarians and semi-vegetarians were all included in the Adventist Health Study, which followed participants for up to seven years.
23
Mar
2015
 
Just in time for Meat Free Week come two new studies to remind us why it's smart to upsize portions of plant food and ease back on the meat. One was the study of more than 77,000 Seventh Day Adventists reported earlier this month that found that compared to nonvegetarians, vegetarians had a 20 per cent lower risk of colorectal cancer (although, interestingly, adding fish to the veggies was better still, with plant and fish eaters having an even lower risk).
 
The other was the analysis of the lifestyle habits of 451,256 Europeans that found those eating the most plant foods around 70 per cent of their diet had a 20 per cent lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, compared to those eating the least plant foods.
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