Latest News

28
Feb
2015
 
A new blood test for bowel cancer may encourage more Australians to undergo screening for the country's second-biggest cancer killer. Too many Australians avoid the faecal test because they consider it embarrassing or messy, experts say.
 
A 2014 report revealed only 40 per cent of Australians over 50 years of age took part in the free tests offered through the national bowel cancer screening program. Gastroenterologist Graeme Young, a spokesman for the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA), said the number of people taking part in the program was alarmingly low.
27
Feb
2015
 
The two halves of the human colon have different embryonic origins and gene expression patterns, and these differences may also play a role in cancer biology, according to a study published in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
 
To determine if there is an association between right or left colon primary tumor location and prognosis in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as efficacy of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, Fotios Loupakis, M.D., Ph.D. of the University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, and U.O. Oncologia Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Pisa, Italy, and colleagues, used data from a prospective pharmacogenetic study and two randomized phase III trials. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed in 2027 patients with metastatic CRC according to tumor location. Given the prognostic impact of BRAF mutational status and mucinous histology and their association to right-sided CRC, the prognostic impact of primary tumor location was also assessed in a subgroup of 200 patients from the prospective PROVETTA study, with full information on BRAF status and details on histology.
27
Feb
2015
 
A donation of $8.9 million has been made to establish a professorial chair in bowel cancer research at the University of Sydney. The majority of funding comes from the national charity Bowel Cancer Australia.
 
Chief executive Julien Wiggins said he hoped the chairperson would be a "game changer" for bowel cancer research in Australia. Bowel cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Australia. "Changing that fact requires significant, longterm funding for dedicated bowel cancer research and that's what we've provided," said Mr Wiggins.
26
Feb
2015
Researching a cure for Australia's second biggest cancer killer is to receive a major boost with $8.9 million to establish a professorial chair in bowel cancer research at the University of Sydney.
 
The majority of funding comes from national charity Bowel Cancer Australia which has committed $5.9 million to establish the position and will be supported by additional funds of $3 million available to the University to advance research into bowel cancer.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia chairman Brian McFadyen said that the establishment of the chair at the University of Sydney was the culmination of many years of effort by the Bowel Cancer Australia Board.
26
Feb
2015
 
A donation of $8.9 million has been made to establish a professorial chair in bowel cancer research at the University of Sydney. The majority of funding comes from national charity Bowel Cancer Australia which has committed $5.9 million to establish the position and additional funds of $3 million for the University to advance research into bowel cancer Australia's second biggest cancer killer.
 
"Latest figures from Cancer Australia reveal that 2009-2011 funding for bowel cancer specific research was $47.8 million, making the $8.9 million a significant injection of funding into the research mix," Bowel Cancer Australia Chief Executive Julien Wiggins said.
ABC Coffs Coast, Coffs Harbour
ABC North Coast NSW, Lismore
ABC News 24, Sydney
 
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