Tagged: #Meat Free Week 2016

01
Aug
2016
Whole grains contain cancer protective nutrients, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phenols, lignans, resistant starch and fibre - also known as ‘roughage’.
 
According to the AICR eNews (2016), 170 grams per day of naturally high fibre foods which include whole grains, can lower the risk of colorectal cancer by up to 21% [1].

Teff (Eragrostis tef) is a new supergrain to western culture. Its pseudonym is ‘lovegrass’. It was used in civilisation as early as 4000 BC. Originating in Ethiopia and Africa teff was made into flat spongy bread called injera which was used as a plate/utensil where other foods were loaded on top and the bread served as a fork or spoon to hold the meal.
Published in Recipes
01
Aug
2016
Winter is the time to take advantage of the seasonal glut of citrus fruit by making fresh juices to add zest to any meal. Lemons are great for digestion. Couple them with some freshly squeezed oranges for a hit of vitamin C, perfect remedy for seasonal colds and flus. Enjoy the juice as a tasty starter before breakfast or during lunch at home.

OJ with a twist

Ingredients (Serves two with low fibre content)
  • 2 small peeled oranges (or three peeled mandarins)
  • 1 small peeled lemon
  • 1 small peeled lime
  • 1 3 cms chunk of piece of freshly peeled ginger cut into slices
  • 1 3 cms chunk of freshly peeled turmeric
  • Dash of cinnamon powder
  • 2 tablespoons of honey
  • ½ cup of water
  • Ice cubes for serving (if desired)
  • Fresh mint leaves for decoration
Published in Recipes
01
Aug
2016
Move over edamame, lupins are the new bean on the block. Lupins (Lupenis spp.) were discovered as a food crop in Australia in the 1970’s. They were consumed throughout history for centuries particularly in Russia and Poland. Lupins could be the new ‘superfood’ they are low in fat 5-10%, high protein 40-45 %, and 20-30 % fibre so they pack a nutritional punch! What makes these beans extra special is that they do not contain the enzymes that block nutrition in some beans such as trypsin inhibitors and saponins.

Older research suggests that they may aid in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood glucose, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure as well as helping to reduce weight. Due to their fibre content they are good for the bowel, lowering bowel pH and have prebiotic properties. They are also gluten free [1]. They are not a complete protein, however combined with other grains high in methionine, they will provide a complete protein with a biological value (high absorption rate) close to that of eggs [2].
Published in Recipes
26
Jul
2016
Makes 4 serves – approx. 5-6 balls each, approximately 2-3 grams of fibre per serve

*Vegetarian, VG

Ingredients
  • 230 grams of silken tofu
  • 1/2 cup of white bread crumbs
  • 1/3 cup of parmesan (or vegan parmesan) cheese
  • 1 egg (or egg equivalent)
  • 1 teaspoon powdered garlic
  • 2 teaspoons of mixed dried Italian herbs
  • 2 teaspoons of tomato paste
  • Olive oil spray
  • Salt and pepper to taste
    (pasta sauce of choice and cooked spaghetti for 4)
Published in Recipes
26
Jul
2016
Makes 4 serves – approx. 5-6 balls each, approximately 7-8 grams of fibre per serve

*Vegetarian, VG

Ingredients
  • 230 grams of tempeh
  • 1/2 cup of wholemeal bread crumbs
  • 1/3 cup of parmesan (or vegan parmesan) cheese
  • 1 egg (or egg equivalent)
  • ½ cup of grated onion
  • 2 teaspoons of mixed dried Italian herbs
  • 2 teaspoons of tomato paste
  • Olive oil spray
  • Salt and pepper to taste
    (pasta sauce of choice and cooked spaghetti for 4)
Published in Recipes
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