Tagged: #Julien Wiggins

27
Jul
2016
Australia’s 5-year relative survival rate from bowel cancer has increased 9% from 60% in 1998–2000 to 69% in 2009–2011, placing Australia above the OECD average (62%), according to a new report* released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).
 
For Australian males, rates increased from 59% to 68%, and for Australian females rates improved from 61% to 70% over the same period.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia CEO Julien Wiggins welcomed the news, saying bowel cancer survival rates were heading in the right direction but indicated there was still a long way to go given they continue to lag behind those of other common cancers, such as breast, prostate and melanoma.
 
“Short of the discovery of a cure, our goal is for bowel cancer 5-year relative survival rates to improve beyond 90%.  We are optimistic that - collectively - increased screening participation, improved access to timely colonoscopy and surgery, and affordable precision medicines based on biomarker status, will positively impact survival as well as improve the quality of life for people living with bowel cancer," Mr Wiggins said.
 
"Bowel Cancer Australia has long advocated for improvements across the continuum of care.  We continue to provide practical prevention, early detection and support programs as well as fund research, ensuring that our work makes real change happen."
 
 
*Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health-care Quality Indicators for Australia
Published in Latest News
20
Jul
2016
Participation in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) has remained stagnant according to new figures released by the Australian Institute of Health & Welfare (AIHW) today.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia chief executive Mr Julien Wiggins said recent participation appears to be on a downward trajectory from a high of 43.5% in 2008-09, to 37.3% in 2013-14 even when based on newly applied participation indicators.
 
The NBCSP continues to play catch-up with medical guidelines, which recommend screening every 1-2 years for average risk Australians from age 50.
 
2.3 million Australians were eligible to receive a tax-payer funded kit through the government program in 2013-14, but with full implementation not expected until 2020 for people aged 50-74 its life-saving potential is far from optimal.
Published in Latest News
19
Jul
2016
A new report published in the Medical Journal of Australia1 has reinforced findings from the My Bowel Cancer...My Voice survey released in June 2016.
 
As part of the new survey of more than 1500 Australians living in Victoria, investigators examined hospital patients’ visits to their GP and the time taken to see a cancer specialist preceding their cancer diagnosis.

The study showed that for patients with bowel cancer, the wait to see a hospital specialist exceeded three months from the time it was recognised something was wrong, suggesting ‘patients or GPs erroneously attribute symptoms to more common, benign conditions’.2
Published in Latest News
07
Jul
2016
New research has revealed fragments of cancer-related DNA, circulating in the blood of colon cancer patients can be used to identify if chemotherapy following surgery is warranted.
 
A blood-based screening test has been designed to determine a patient’s risk of colon cancer recurrence after surgery by scientists at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, with international partners from Ludwig Cancer Research and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Accurate testing of this risk factor in patients following tumour removal could eliminate the demanding experience of chemotherapy post-surgery, if it is deemed unnecessary.
 
“Tailoring interventions based on patients’ individual circumstances can improve quality of life by reducing unnecessary treatments which offer little to no benefit,” said Julien Wiggins, CEO of Bowel Cancer Australia.
Published in Latest News
03
Jun
2016
A national study of Australians diagnosed with bowel cancer – the country’s second biggest cancer killer – reveals three quarters of respondents presented to their GP with symptoms, yet one in five felt their symptoms were not taken seriously.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia chief executive Mr Julien Wiggins said the findings from the My Bowel Cancer...My Voice survey, released to coincide with Bowel Cancer Awareness Month, point to the need to ensure all Australians make symptoms a priority and GPs facilitate timely investigations and diagnosis.
 
“We know Australians hold GPs in high regard, however people need to feel confident knowing their symptoms or concerns will be taken seriously,” Mr Wiggins said.
Published in Latest News
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