Tagged: #Chemotherapy

17
Jul
2017
Beauty blogger, Marisa Robinson normally writes about makeup and glamour.

However, in an effort to raise awareness, Marissa has written about her recent diagnosis with bowel cancer, at the age of 32, and how it has affected her life.

“There is no glorifying what a scary and horrible disease cancer is,” Marisa said, “but I hope that by sharing my experience I can spread awareness and encourage others to learn more about bowel awareness, be aware of possible symptoms and realise that you're never too young to be affected by bowel cancer.”
Published in Latest News
06
Mar
2017
I was feeling fine, but there was quite a bit of blood appearing in my stool - I just put it down to haemorrhoids.
 
My partner kept telling me to see the doctor, but of course, I did the male thing and ignored her pleas.
 
After experiencing a bowel motion consisting only of blood, I finally went to the GP.
Published in Latest News
06
Mar
2017
It can take a while before a person feels like their old self following bowel cancer treatment.

Bowel Care Nurse Fiona recommends taking plenty of time to recover and creating a one or two-year plan to get back on your feet.

“It’s important not to worry yourself or rush yourself through recovery.”
Published in Latest News
15
Sep
2016
At the conclusion of Bowel Cancer Australia’s Be Well Week campaign, we asked those who have had or are living with bowel cancer to send in their top tips for feeling well. The response was wonderful and so were the ideas!

We hope some (or all) of the tips shared will help you or someone you know in the face of operations, chemotherapy and on the road to recovery.
Published in Latest News
07
Jul
2016
New research has revealed fragments of cancer-related DNA, circulating in the blood of colon cancer patients can be used to identify if chemotherapy following surgery is warranted.
 
A blood-based screening test has been designed to determine a patient’s risk of colon cancer recurrence after surgery by scientists at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, with international partners from Ludwig Cancer Research and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Accurate testing of this risk factor in patients following tumour removal could eliminate the demanding experience of chemotherapy post-surgery, if it is deemed unnecessary.
 
“Tailoring interventions based on patients’ individual circumstances can improve quality of life by reducing unnecessary treatments which offer little to no benefit,” said Julien Wiggins, CEO of Bowel Cancer Australia.
Published in Latest News
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