October 2018
24
Oct
2018

Around 11 Australians will lose their lives to bowel cancer every day, according to Australia’s first national report presenting comprehensive data specific to digestive-tract cancers.

By year’s end, it is estimated the disease will claim the lives of 4,129 family members, friends, and loved ones.

The report reveals that new cases of bowel cancer detected in Australia are rising, due in part to a growing and ageing population and the introduction of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in 2006.

Every day, approximately 47 Australians are told for the first time that they have bowel cancer.

24
Oct
2018

Big thanks to all our supporters who participated in Meat Free Week 2018 and congratulations on completing the challenge!

Whether you went meat-free for the full week, joined us for a Meat Free Week-end or helped us to start out strong with a Meat Free Monday (or two), every little bit helps, and we really appreciate your support.

19
Oct
2018

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Are you an Aussie man living with or beyond bowel cancer, or do you have a male family member or friend that is?

We’re seeking volunteers of all ages to share their experiences to help raise awareness of bowel cancer in men as part of Decembeard Australia 2018.

19
Oct
2018

Enjoy barbequing at home or plan to host a BBQ for friends and family this weekend?

Before you get the grill going, check out our delicious grill-friendly recipes, as well as some healthy tips for your next BBQ.  

15
Oct
2018

Carers and loved ones provide unpaid and ongoing care and support to someone they know affected by a temporary or chronic illness or condition.

Although carers and loved ones may find caring for someone rewarding at times, those feelings can change to anger, guilt or exhaustion if the carer forgets to take care of themselves.

Research shows that many of those caring for loved ones with cancer report feeling helpless and overwhelmed, either because they find it hard to see their loved one struggling, they don’t have the medical training required to care for their loved one, or they don’t know how or what to do to help.

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