About Bowel Cancer Diagnosis 770newfinal

A Bowel Cancer Diagnosis

There's no denying it, for even the most positive of people, being diagnosed with cancer will come as a terrible shock.  Many bowel cancer patients describe everything being 'a bit of a blur' after they are told.
 
If possible, it is important not to make too many decisions about what happens next, in your initial diagnosis session.  First, you'll need to let the news sink in, and seek support from friends and family.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia's nurses are on hand to offer support and answer your questions and concerns. Please call the Bowel Cancer Australia Helpline on 1800 555 494.
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Bowel Cancer Australia Support-What-I-Need-to-ask 770new

What I Need to Ask?

A bowel cancer diagnosis, or being told by your doctor that you may have bowel cancer, can come as quite a shock.
 
It is a time when you need to ask lots of important questions of your doctor and/or specialist. You will have many thoughts running through your head and may find it difficult to think clearly.
 
Below is a list of helpful questions you may like to ask your doctor and/or treating specialist.
 
Bowel Cancer Austraila's What I Need to Ask questions are categorised according to the different circumstances in which you may find yourself, as well as the type of treatment sought.
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About Bowel Cancer Your-Medical-Team 770new

Your Medical & Nursing Team

In Australia, everyone diagnosed with bowel cancer is treated by a team of expert doctors, nurses, specialists and therapists who specialise in the diagnosis, treatment and management of people with bowel cancer.
 
If you are worried about any aspect of the disease – if you have symptoms and don't know what to do; if you have just been diagnosed; or have questions about treatment options or living with the physical effects of bowel cancer - our nurses are on hand to offer support and answer your questions and concerns.  Please call the Bowel Cancer Australia Helpline on 1800 555 494.
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About Bowel Cancer Your-Pathway 770new

Your Pathway

There's no denying it, for even the most positive of people, being diagnosed with cancer will come as a terrible shock.
 
Many bowel cancer patients describe everything being 'a bit of a blur' after they are told.
 
If possible, it is important not to make hurried decisions about what happens next during your initial consultation with your specialist.
 
Bowel Cancer Australia's nurses are on hand to offer support and answer your questions and concerns.  Please call the Bowel Cancer Australia Helpline on 1800 555 494.
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About Bowel Cancer-Bowel-Cancer-Staging 770new

Bowel Cancer Staging

If you are diagnosed with bowel cancer, you will firstly need to have tests to determine the size of the cancer tumour, its position and whether it has spread. This process is known as 'staging'.
 
Your doctor needs to know the extent (stage) of the disease to plan the best treatment. The stage is based on whether the tumour has invaded nearby tissues, whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body.
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About Bowel Cancer Prognosis-770NEW

5-year Survival

'Relative survival' estimates are considered when examining survival from cancer.  These estimates are derived by comparing the survival of people diagnosed with cancer (observed survival) with that expected by people in the general population of equivalent age, sex and calendar year (expected survival).
 
The ratio of observed to expected survival is used as an indicator of the proportion of people who survived their cancer.
 
The 5-year relative survival for bowel cancer increased from 48% to 66% between 1982-1987 and 2006-2010.
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About Bowel Cancer-My-Cancer-Genome 770

My Cancer Genome

Knowledge of the genetic mutations associated with different cancer types is increasing rapidly and is already influencing treatment choices.
 
The My Cancer Genome website is a database of information on genes, genetic mutations and cancer. It includes information on the latest research and the latest treatments across many cancer types (including bowel cancer).
 
The website also highlights the benefits of genetic testing especially when knowledge of a particular gene mutation can affect treatment decisions.
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About Bowel Cancer Finding-Support 770NEW

Finding Support

Bowel Cancer Australia's nurses support bowel cancer patients and their families by phone and email.
 
Whether you are worried about symptoms, recently diagnosed or living with bowel cancer our nurses are on hand to offer support and answer your questions and concerns.
 
Call the Bowel Cancer Australia Helpline on 1800 555 494.
 
You can also download or order hard copies of our patient booklets and factsheets which cover all aspects of bowel cancer.
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  • icon What Happens Next?A Bowel Cancer Diagnosis
  • icon What I Need To Ask?Diagnosis - Treatment
  • icon Your Medical TeamFind A Specialist
  • icon Your PathwayBowel Cancer Treatment
  • icon Bowel Cancer StagingSize - Position - Spread
  • icon Prognosis5-year Survival
  • icon My Cancer GenomeInformed Cancer Medicine
  • icon Finding SupportWe're Here To Help